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Jun 29, 2018

MASCC/ISOO Annual Meeting on Supportive Care in Cancer

12 / CANCER SURVIVORSHIP NEEDS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLE IN CANADA: A KNOWLEDGE TRANSLATION STRATEGY

;

Gifford;

W.;

Thomas;

R.;

Graham;

I.D.

indigenous people

survivorship

knowledge translation

canada

Abstract

Abstract

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Keywords

indigenous people

survivorship

knowledge translation

canada

Abstract

Cancer among Indigenous people in Canada is increasing faster than overall cancer rates. Lack of culturally safe survivorship supports that incorporate traditional values and practices and recognize the historical impacts of colonization contributes to poor health outcomes and low 5year survival rates. Little has been done to address the unique survivorship needs of Indigenous peoples and few supports have considered the intersections of culture, history, and marginalization. Objectives: To understand how healthcare approaches and practices can address the unique cancer survivorship needs of Indigenous people in Canada and improve healthcare delivery and outcomes. Methods: As an early stage of a larger study, a research retreat was held with an Advisory Group (n=13) of Indigenous Elders, traditional teachers, survivors, caregivers, providers, and non-Indigenous researchers to determine how survivorship supports can be developed and implemented. A video highlighting Indigenous people's experiences with cancer, developed from our previous photovoice study, was viewed and a focussed discussions of how messages from the video could be incorporated into survivorship practices. The meeting was audio-taped, transcribed and inductively analyzed. Results: Five themes emerged as integral to Indigenous survivorship: healing supports (spirituality, nature, art, traditional medicines); cultural healthcare (holistic, patient-centered, community based); caregiver support; social isolation (art, leadership training, peer support); and system navigation. Art, community and culture were central to all themes. Based on results, a logic model is guiding implementation. Conclusion: Collaboratively working with Indigenous people can facilitate understanding of their unique cancer survivorship needs to improve healthcare services, quality of life, and health outcomes.

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© Copyright 2019 Morressier GmbH.
All rights reserved.