We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website Learn more

Nov 9, 2018

COGI-2018

02 - DENGUE AND MALARIA INFECTION IN PREGNANCY: MATERNAL, FETAL AND NEONATAL OUTCOMES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

dengue

malaria

pregnancy

neonatal outcomes

maternal outcomes

obgyn

Abstract

Abstract

thumbnail

Keywords

dengue

malaria

pregnancy

neonatal outcomes

maternal outcomes

obgyn

Abstract

Problem Statement: Malaria and dengue infections are a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Pregnant women are more susceptible to severe forms of these infections, with poorer outcomes. Our paper aims to study the maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcomes in pregnant patients infected with either dengue or malaria admitted to a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan, a country where malaria and dengue is endemic and on the rise. Methods: An observational, retrospective review of patient medical records was carried out for pregnant and post-partum women who were admitted with either dengue or malaria infections from January 2011 to December 2015 inclusive at the Aga Khan University Hospital, in Karachi, Pakistan. Outcomes were compared between these two groups as well as a third group consisting of women diagnosed with multiple infections in addition to dengue and/or malaria as per predefined criteria. Results: We included 85 women who were admitted with dengue and/or malaria infections. More women had contracted dengue fever as compared to malaria (56% vs 21%), and 22% of patients were found to have multiple infections. No significant difference in the mean gestational age at delivery was noted among dengue and malaria patients, however a significant difference was seen when compared to the multiple infections group (p<0.01), delivering preterm at 30 weeks. The mean neonatal birth weight in malaria patients was significant lower (p=0.02) compared to dengue patients. No significant differences were seen in type of delivery, status of neonate at birth, birth anomalies and birth injuries among the groups. Six women (7%) died during admission due to multi-organ involvement. Conclusion: Dengue and malaria remain an under-reported cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Due to their similar presentation, it is imperative to develop more efficient guidelines to screen and diagnose these infections in pregnancy.

Discover over 20,000 new abstracts, posters and presentations from leading academic conferences every month. Stay on top of the latest findings, methodologies and discussions happening in your research field around the world.

Company

Legal

Follow us

© Copyright 2019 Morressier GmbH. All rights reserved.

© Copyright 2019 Morressier GmbH.
All rights reserved.