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Oct 25, 2018

7th Congress of the European Academy of Paediatric Societies

0578 - SKINFOLD TECHNIQUES WHEN PROVIDING SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTIONS

skinfold

techniques

subcutaneous

injections

Abstract

Abstract

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Keywords

skinfold

techniques

subcutaneous

injections

Abstract

Background and aims Many children with various disease receive medicines by subcutaneous injections as part of their treatment. It is unclear how to hold the skinfold during this procedure in order to provide the medicine correctly. This variation in care is undesirable for nurses, and for children and parents who are taught to inject subcutaneously. Therefore, we systematically searched the literature who investigated the effectiveness and safety of different skinfold techniques when providing subcutaneous injections in pediatric patients. Methods We researched PubMed and CINAHL for studies published between 2007 and 2017. No further limits were applied. The articles were selected on title, abstract and full-text according predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Tools of the Cochrane Collaboration were used for quality assessment and data extraction. Results We included 4 moderate quality studies. The overall results are congruent and show that skinfold technique and needle length are associated with an increased risk of incorrect subcutaneous injections (p<0.0001). Unintended intramuscular injections occurred more frequently with vertically inserted 6mm and with 450-angle inserted 8mm needles, compared with 450-angle inserted 6mm needles (42% vs 5% and 24% vs 5%, p<0.001). Even with 4mm needles, there is 20.2% chance of injecting intramuscular when 450-angle technique is not applied, and this rate doubles with 5mm and triples with 6mm needles. The included studies do not report significant changes in the number of adverse events. Conclusion Based on available evidence we recommend the 450-angle skinfold technique and 4mm needles when providing a subcutaneous injection in pediatric patients.

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© Copyright 2019 Morressier GmbH.
All rights reserved.