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Mar 22, 2020

ACS Spring 2020 National Meeting & Expo

10 Years of bioinspired polymer structures: Antimicrobially active materials for interfaces and applications

antimicrobial polymers

bioactive polymers

nanostructured polymer surfaces

self-regenerating polymer surfaces

protein-repellent polymer surfaces

Abstract

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Abstract

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Keywords

antimicrobial polymers

bioactive polymers

nanostructured polymer surfaces

self-regenerating polymer surfaces

protein-repellent polymer surfaces

Abstract

100 years ago, Hermann Staudinger accomplished his ground-breaking discoveries about the macromolecular nature of both biological and synthetic polymers. With his impressive work, he made the University of Freiburg the birth place of polymer science. Standing on the shoulders of this giant, we also humbly celebrate the 10the anniversary of the Polymer Synthesis and Surface Engineering Group at the University of Freiburg. We herein review our contributions to the field of bioinspired polymers for biomedical applications.<br/>Bacterial infections of patients often initiate at the surface of medical devices. In consequence, biofilms form, often with life-threatening consequences. It is estimated that by 2050, up to 10 million people will die every year due to bacterial infections if the current trends cannot be reverted. Thus, antimicrobial polymers are currently experiencing a renaissance both as drugs and materials. Polycationic materials have long been known for their antimicrobial activity; however, they fail once they are fully covered by bacterial debris. To overcome this problem, we followed different strategies. First, we designed micro- and nanostructured polymer surfaces from a protein-repellent and an antimicrobial poly(oxanorbornene) by colloidal lithography and microcontact printing. By varying the polymer patch sizes, we obtained structure-property relationships for the interaction of these patterned polymer surfaces with proteins, bacteria, and human cells, and found that they were simultaneously protein-repellent, antimicrobial, and cell-compatible at a spacing of 1-2 µm, a size matching bacterial dimensions. We also serendipitously found a stimulus-responsive poly(oxanorbornenes) that was protein-repellent and cell adhesive, yet antimicrobial when in contact with bacteria, and thus makes ideal material for implant coatings. Finally, we investigated interfaces that can shed their functional skin when contaminated, like a reptile, and thereby regenerate their original surface functionality.

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© Copyright 2019 Morressier GmbH.
All rights reserved.