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May 20, 2019

Women Deliver 2019 Conference

The Cervix Doula:  Can decentralizing Primary Healthcare in resource-limited settings be more effective in delivering Comprehensive health and cancer prevention services?

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Cervical Cancer

Primary Healthcare

Comprehensive health

HPV

CHW

UHC

Abstract

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42

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Abstract

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Keywords

Cervical Cancer

Primary Healthcare

Comprehensive health

HPV

CHW

UHC

Abstract

Despite global efforts to eradicate Cervical cancer, it continues to be the number one cause of cancer and cancer mortality amongst women in Zimbabwe, annually accounting for over 3180 new cases and 2150 deaths (28.9% and 19.6% respectively of all cancer cases) (1). A high HIV prevalence rate, persistent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection, coupled with other risk factors, such as multiparity and multiple sexual partners, are some of the syndemic factors that predispose Zimbabwean women and put them at a higher risk of developing cervical cancer (2). In recent years the Government, through the Ministry of Health and Child welfare (MoHCW), launched several nationwide VIAC (Visual Acetic acid) screening and HPV vaccination programs, targeting ‘at-risk’ women and girls in marginalized, vulnerable communities (3). Though these programs have considerably succeeded in reducing the mortality rates through early diagnosis, a greater proportion of these at-risk population’s needs remain unmet, largely due to gaps implementing programs and budget deficits (4). In this study, we investigate the Pakistani ‘Lady Health worker’ and the Liberian ‘Last Mile Health’, two models which focus on decentralizing Primary healthcare (PHC) services through ‘non-healthcare staff’ in resource-limited communities, to see their applicability and feasibility if implemented in delivering preventive cervical cancer interventions in Zimbabwe (; 6). Our aim is to prove that by integrating local ‘trusted’ people and traditional practices into rolling out these cervical cancer screening programs, we can radically increase the number of early diagnoses and linkage-to-care (treatment) in these communities, thereby reducing the burden of Cervical cancer significantly (2;6).

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© Copyright 2019 Morressier GmbH.
All rights reserved.