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Apr 30, 2020

ACS Spring 2020 National Meeting & Expo

Nanophotonic engineering of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

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Abstract

The discovery of 2D materials endows scientists and engineers new opportunities to explore 2D physics and develop high-performance and portable electronic and photonic devices. Among 2D materials, monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been extensively studied to explore their potentials in optoelectronic and photonic applications, such as the solar energy harvesting, light-emitting diodes, and photodetectors, because they have a direct bandgap in the visible and near-infrared range, large oscillator strength, large exciton binding energy, excellent tunability of optical properties. Despite these merits, the implementation of monolayer TMDCs in practical applications is still challenging, because they suffer from drawbacks, such as the low photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield and intrinsic short light-matter interaction length. Nanophotonic engineering of monolayer TMDCs is an emerging field that aims to address those challenges. For instance, by integrating monolayer TMDCs with nanophotonic resonators, the PL of monolayer TMDCs can be strongly enhanced via Purcell effect. Moreover, the enormous field enhancement brought by nanophotonic resonators also enables their coupling with monolayer TMDCs to achieve the strong coupling regime. In addition, the inversion symmetry breaking also grants monolayer TMDCs a large second-order nonlinear susceptibility. However, the interaction between monolayer TMDCs and the pump laser is limited by their atomically thin thickness. Recent studies demonstrate that nanophotonic resonators can boost the second harmonic generation from monolayer TMDCs with thousands of times increase. Besides aforementioned conventional optical properties, monolayer TMDCs process the valley degree of freedom, strong spin-orbit coupling, and reduced dielectric screening, which endues them and heterostructures made of their vertical stacks with exotic excitonic properties, including valley-polarized excitons, dark excitons, and moiré excitons. New studies have emerged to utilize nanophotonic techniques to explore and exploit those exotic excitonic properties, such as the separation of valley-polarized excitons using an asymmetric metasurface and the radiative control of dark excitons via a nanophotonic antenna.

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© Copyright 2019 Morressier GmbH.
All rights reserved.