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Oct 22, 2018

7th Congress of the European Academy of Paediatric Societies

PRETERM CHILDREN’S LONG-TERM ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AFTER ADAPTIVE COMPUTERIZED TRAINING: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

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preterm birth

school success

randomized controlled trial

computerized training

intervention

follow-up

Abstract

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Keywords

preterm birth

school success

randomized controlled trial

computerized training

intervention

follow-up

Abstract

Background and aims. Preterm children often struggle in school because of working memory and mathematic difficulties. Adaptive computerized interventions may help improve academic success but randomized trials for school-aged preterm children are rare. We tested whether adaptive online math training (XtraMath) versus working memory training (Cogmed) improves academic performance. Methods. During their first year of elementary school, N=65 preterm children (28 – 35+6 weeks gestation; stratified for gestational age and gender) were recruited into a prospective multi-center trial (Figure 1). Participants were randomized into two groups and received one of two computerized trainings at home for five weeks. Teachers rated academic performance (TAAS) in math, reading, and attention compared to classmates before (pretest), directly after (posttest), and 12 months after the intervention (follow-up). Total academic growth (change from baseline) was calculated as z-standardized difference. Math tests were administered as secondary outcomes. Results. Bootstrapped linear regressions with intervention as main factor and baseline TAAS (T1) as covariate showed that total academic growth to post-test was higher in the XtraMath group (B= -.29 [95% CI: -.60 to -.04], p=.045), but this difference was not sustained at 12-months follow-up (B=.10 [-.64 to .87], p=.784; Figure 2a). There were no significant group differences on secondary outcomes according to training condition, however, children in the XtraMath group showed a tendency to do better in math (Figure 2b). Conclusions. Our findings do not show a difference in effectiveness between Cogmed and the open-access online training XtraMath, but XtraMath may tend to better support preterm children’s success in mathematics.

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© Copyright 2019 Morressier GmbH.
All rights reserved.