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Oct 4, 2018

11th World Stroke Congress

THE VALUE OF VOLUNTEERS: ENHANCING COMMUNICATION PRACTICE AND PARTICIPATION FOR CLIENTS WITH APHASIA

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volunteer

communication

aphasia

speech-language pathology

rehabilitation

Abstract

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Abstract

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Keywords

volunteer

communication

aphasia

speech-language pathology

rehabilitation

Abstract

Title: THE VALUE OF VOLUNTEERS: ENHANCING COMMUNICATION PRACTICE AND PARTICIPATION FOR CLIENTS WITH APHASIA Authors: Lauren Edwards, R.SLP, Carlee Juurakko, R.SLP, and Andrea Simioni, R.SLP Inpatient Neurorehabilitation Unit, Carewest Dr. Vernon Fanning Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Disclosure of Conflict of Interest: None Abstract Topic: #16 Multidisciplinary Clinical Rehabilitation Background: The Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations (2015) recommend that treatment for aphasia include participation in conversation groups. Conversation groups can be guided by trained volunteers overseen by a Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) to supplement the intensity of therapy during hospitalization (Evidence level B). Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA™) is an evidence-based set of techniques developed by the Aphasia Institute to facilitate communication for adults with aphasia (Kagan, 1998). A volunteer conversation partner program incorporating SCA™ training was developed on our inpatient rehabilitation unit. Methods: Volunteers were recruited through a local university and through word-of-mouth. Volunteers completed a general SCA™ Workshop (Module 1) and participated in direct one-on-one conversation training with a client with aphasia and an SLP. SLPs evaluated each volunteer using the Aphasia Institute’s Measure of Skill in Supported Conversation (MSC). Volunteers were assigned to be one-on-one conversation partners or to facilitate a conversation group. Volunteers and clients completed questionnaires to provide feedback on their experiences with the volunteer program. Results: Six volunteers were recruited and trained in the volunteer conversation program. A weekly conversation group as well as one-on-one conversations occurred outside of regularly scheduled therapy times. Group and one-on-one conversations supplemented therapy intensity on our unit. Clients and volunteers reported positive experiences with the program. Conclusion: The volunteer conversation program was beneficial for our clients with aphasia. More volunteers should be recruited and trained as conversation partners for continuation of the program.

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© Copyright 2019 Morressier GmbH.
All rights reserved.